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JUNIOR VAZQUEZ’ CAREER HAS MARKED MANY MILESTONES OF OUR TIME, WITH THE LIKES OF WHITNEY HOUSTON, DEBORAH COX, MADONNA, JANET JACKSON, CYNDI LAUPER, P!NK, KRISTINE W, BEYONCE, LISA LISA, BRITNEY SPEARS, SPICE GIRLS AND OF COURSE CHER, JUST TO NAME A FEW! ALL OF THESE ARTISTS HAVE LONGEVITY IN THE INDUSTRY, AS DOES JUNIOR HIMSELF ALONG WITH HIS REMIXES. THE SAME GOES FOR HIS MALE ARTISTS. JUNIOR HAS HAD A RADIO SHOW ON 103.5 KTU AND HAS PLAYED THE LARGEST AND MOST SUCCESSFUL CLUBS IN NYC SUCH AS SOUND FACTORY, TWILO, TUNNEL, PALLADIUM, ROXY AND THE LIST GOES ON AND ON – ALL OVER THE COUNTRY AND BEYOND. JUNIOR VASQUEZ HAS PRODUCED ALBUMS AND RELEASED COMPILATIONS THAT MOST OF US STILL PLAY ON OUR IPODS OR WHILE AT HOME, IN THE CAR OR AT THE GYM TODAY, INCLUDING REMIXES THAT DATE BACK MULTIPLE DECADES…MUSIC THAT STILL MOVES US ON THE DANCE FLOOR.

Junior Vasquez continues to be one of the most recognizable names in the nightlife industry, and this Pride he is coming home to NYC at BPM Nightclub for another year in the city where he started it all. In the midst of a comprehensive and long-awaited retrospective project, Junior kicks off this next chapter by spinning Pride Sunday in New York City once again like no other.

What do you foresee is the next chapter in the club music industry?
I’m not one to forecast or say that I foresee anything. I think the artists of my generation and the producers I’ve worked with years ago who are still doing it would probably agree that there’s a lot of truth in the saying “what goes around comes around.” I’ve seen the taglines, headlines, the #hashtags as the e-lebrities call it and names for genres, etc.
Calling it a movement one year then all of a sudden an “a-ha” moment when people realize it’s just a reinterpretation of what’s already been done before. I’ve done so much over the years that I’m sampling myself at times, and dance music of today is pulling a lot from the past. I don’t see anything different from what’s already been done.

It seems there is a need for “big-name voices.” Do you foresee more anthems from these powerhouse ladies with yourself in the near future?
Some of the biggest voices don’t necessarily have a big name, and it takes more than a marquee name for me to want to work with a singer. If they have soul and we connect, very much like I do with Lydia Rhodes – my soul sister! – then there’s a very spiritual bond that forms, because it starts with respect and sharing the love for the music. There’s a lot of trust involved, and yeah, I’m proud of that. But I’m also grateful that so many artists have called on me to produce a track and do what I do. I don’t know if that answers your question, but the short answer is, yes, I’d work with the Chers and Madonnas again. But just as I don’t want to do the samething over, I’d challenge any diva to get in the studio with me so we can challenge each other and create something that’s light years beyond what we ever thought we could do. That’s how it’s gotta be. It can’t be forced.

What was your most challenging Remix?
The Whitney Houston project. When I did the mixes for her greatest hits compilation, I gave my all for that and think about her everyday. I can still remember being in her home, and when you work that closely with an artist, a friend, it stays with you. May she rest in peace. So I guest the challenge is more with the emotional bond, not so much the creative side. I just do it.

What artist do you listen to when you have free time?
I usually watch TV.

After having so much success, what keeps you inspired?
My dog. Peace. And quiet. Just trying to be as calm as I can, because when I play or get ready to play it’s hectic, and it takes a lot out of me. What keeps me inspired [is] the time leading up to it when everything gets closer to the deadline, and I focus on concepts and catch myself listening to music and hearing things that spark something else. Like a play, it has to have its opening number, different sections, the core, the ending. Sometimes it might be three different endings. That’s
what inspires me. Sometimes I might hear a song in a Jerry Bruckheimer movie, real “homegrown” music, hence a song like “Babylon” or “Superman.” That’s what inspires me.

Why are the start-up artists finding ways to get their music to the public, but established big-name artists seem to not get their music out as quickly?
Because instead of running around Lower Manhattan with a demo tape, they’re pumping it out online. Don’t confuse quantity with quality, and you can’t deny that a hot boy band will sell records. It’s business.

What are your plans for the rest of 2014? What can we expect from Junior Vasquez?
Putting together my retrospective, which is a big project with a lot of layers to it. At the same time I’m looking toward the future and working on new music, a new
label, different design projects. Jason Walker is wearing jewelry I designed in his “Tell It To My Heart” video. Everything I do is one-of-a-kind, and I’ll set pieces in everything from steel to platinum. I’m rambling, that’s an earful. And, YES, I started my book. Let me just say that there’s much more to me than meet the ear.

You’re playing BPM Nightclub (516 W. 42nd St.) for NYC Pride night with a performance by Lydia Rhodes. What do you have in store for us that night?
Come and find out. I’m playing all night from 11 p.m. to 6 a.m.516 W. 42nd St.For information and tickets: www.bpmny.com/Juniorjrvsqz.com
Also find him on iTunes, Facebook, Twitter and Soundcloud

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